Palazzo tours – Palazzo Beau http://palazzobeau.com/ Tue, 26 Oct 2021 12:31:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://palazzobeau.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/profile.png Palazzo tours – Palazzo Beau http://palazzobeau.com/ 32 32 Guided Tours Offer A Glimpse Of The ‘Catacombs’ Of Downtown Indianapolis | Indiana News https://palazzobeau.com/guided-tours-offer-a-glimpse-of-the-catacombs-of-downtown-indianapolis-indiana-news/ https://palazzobeau.com/guided-tours-offer-a-glimpse-of-the-catacombs-of-downtown-indianapolis-indiana-news/#respond Sat, 04 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://palazzobeau.com/guided-tours-offer-a-glimpse-of-the-catacombs-of-downtown-indianapolis-indiana-news/ By RYAN TRARES, Daily Journal INDIANAPOLIS (AP) – Through calm and shadows, the small group of history-conscious visitors literally stepped into the past. The musty smell of damp air and dust filled the space. Electric lights attempted to illuminate the hallways between the brick arches, but intriguing pockets of darkness tempted exploration. They call this […]]]>

By RYAN TRARES, Daily Journal

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) – Through calm and shadows, the small group of history-conscious visitors literally stepped into the past.

The musty smell of damp air and dust filled the space. Electric lights attempted to illuminate the hallways between the brick arches, but intriguing pockets of darkness tempted exploration.

They call this place the catacombs, but the space under the Indianapolis City Market was not meant to be anyone’s final resting place. Rather, they are the remains of one of the city’s most ornate buildings from the early 20th century.

“People love to be underground. We don’t have a lot of opportunities to do it here, ”said Kasey Zronek, director of volunteers and heritage experiences for Indiana Landmarks. “Just walking in and seeing the remains of a place you wouldn’t be otherwise makes it truly unique.”

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Intrigued local residents are invited to travel in the dark on Indiana Landmarks’ new evening tours of the city’s Market Catacombs. On some Thursday evenings through October, people will be guided through the underground collection of brick arches, vaulted ceilings and raw limestone columns.

Along the way, guides from Indiana Landmarks will guide people through the history of the space, connecting it to the city’s current market and its vibrant role in the community. Events 21 and over will include photo op props and drink specials created especially for the event.

“It’s another way to connect people to the story and reach a larger audience,” Zronek said. “We decided to take the catacombs tour and make some adjustments, to try it in a different way.”

The series of arcades and hallways are what remains of a once iconic Indianapolis building. Tomlinson Hall was an imposing building that could accommodate 3,500 people, located next to the existing town market.

The Great Hall was designed by Dietrich Bohlen, the same man who created the town market and the Morris-Butler house nearby. Construction was completed in 1886 and the imposing building housed orchestral performances and other cultural events.

John Phillip Sousa has conducted concerts in space. The first basketball game ever played in Indianapolis – featuring Yale University against players from the local YMCA – was at Tomlinson Hall. Olympic star Jesse Owens spoke at a political rally there, and the Anti-Saloon League held a large convention in the hall during their campaign for the ban.

“I like to think of it as the convention center before we have one,” Zronek said.

For 71 years, the room has been a centerpiece of downtown Indianapolis. But on January 30, 1958, a fire broke out in Tomlinson Hall. More than 20 fire trucks attempted to save the structure and their hoses flooded the streets around the building.

“But they couldn’t save Tomlinson Hall,” Zronek said.

The walls were still standing, but the interior had collapsed. It would have been far too expensive to rebuild.

Above ground, the only indication that Tomlinson Hall had existed is a single arch that stands in the pedestrian plaza. But underground, its story survives. Brick arches, limestone columns and other architectural elements create a unique atmosphere.

In recent years, events such as yoga classes, bourbon tastings, and haunted houses have taken place in the catacombs. A couple even rented the space to host a wedding, Zronek said.

“It’s still a very active space,” she said.

Since 2012, Indiana Landmarks has been organizing space tours on select Saturday mornings from May through October. The events turned out to be so popular that the organizers wanted to expand their offering with a new type of tour.

Night tours take place in the evening, creating a different vibe than the daytime versions. Tours are also longer than those on Saturdays, allowing Indiana Landmarks tour guides to provide more detail and history.

Participants meet on the second floor of the City Market, near the aptly named Tomlinson Tap Room. Before embarking on the adults-only tour, people can purchase an Indiana beer or other beverage to take with them.

“People will have one or two more stories and have more time in the catacombs. We will also set up a table with photo props so people can commemorate their experience, ”Zronek said.

City Market Catacombs Night Tour

What: A 45-minute tour of the remains of the old Tomlinson Hall, a space that has been dubbed the Catacombs.

When: Tours take place every 30 minutes from 4:45 p.m., with the last visit at 7:15 p.m.

Dates: Sept. 9 and 23 and Oct. 7 and 21

Cost: $ 15 for the general public; $ 12 for Indiana Landmarks members

Tickets: Tickets must be purchased in advance at catacombsafterhours2021.eventbrite.com, or by contacting Indiana Landmarks at 317-639-4534 or reservations@indianalandmarks.org

Info: indianalandmarks.org

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


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Six unusual tours of Rome that reveal another side of the city https://palazzobeau.com/six-unusual-tours-of-rome-that-reveal-another-side-of-the-city/ https://palazzobeau.com/six-unusual-tours-of-rome-that-reveal-another-side-of-the-city/#respond Sat, 10 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://palazzobeau.com/six-unusual-tours-of-rome-that-reveal-another-side-of-the-city/ Global spread of coronavirus disrupts travel. Stay up to date on the science behind the outbreak>> To celebrate Rome’s 150th anniversary as the capital of Italy, we’re choosing six ways to experience new sides of the Eternal City, from virtual reality tours of the Colosseum to day trips on a Vespa scooter. Posted July 10, […]]]>

Global spread of coronavirus disrupts travel. Stay up to date on the science behind the outbreak>>

To celebrate Rome’s 150th anniversary as the capital of Italy, we’re choosing six ways to experience new sides of the Eternal City, from virtual reality tours of the Colosseum to day trips on a Vespa scooter.

Posted July 10, 2021, 08:00 BST, Update July 13, 2021, 5:05 PM BST

Campo de ‘Fiori is the oldest market in the capital, with many stalls selling seasonal produce, fresh pasta and local specialties.

Photograph by Alamy

The history of Rome, cradle of the Roman Empire, seat of the Papal States, is so closely linked to power and history that it is easy to forget that it was not always the capital of the ‘Italy. Even in its short modern history, the country has had multiple suitors: the Italian government first met in Turin, then moved to Florence, and only – eventually – moved to Rome in 1871. 150 years later, the Eternal City is still finding new ways to live. living up to its reputation, from catering projects to new design hotels. The following six visits will help you see its ancient charms in a new light.

Read more: Italy travel guide

1. Shop and cook like a local

In Rome… do – and eat – like the Romans do, with the market-to-table dining experience of Walk Inside Rome. Whet your appetite by following a local chef around Campo de ‘Fiori, the capital’s oldest market (pictured), browsing stalls selling seasonal produce, fresh pasta and local specialties. Come for lunch, bring the fresh ingredients to one of the two cooking schools in the historic center – one near Piazza Navona, the other near the Pantheon – and learn how to cook a traditional Italian meal, including a pasta dish, a main course, a side dish and dessert.

2. Visit the burial place of the first emperor

This spring, the Mausoleum of Augustus – the world’s largest circular tomb, a testament to the engineering prowess of the Romans – opened to the public following a 14-year restoration project. A new 50-minute, technology-enhanced tour takes visitors to the inner burial chamber, which was previously off-limits for most of the past 80 years. Book your ticket well in advance or, if you can’t make it right away, learn about the mausoleum and its history through the interactive experience on the new website.

The Castelli Romani have been an oasis for Romans seeking respite since Antiquity.

Photograph by Alamy

3. Explore the Roman countryside on a Vespa scooter

The Castelli Romani, a collection of ancient towns, country villas and crater lakes in the hills of Alban, southeast of the capital, have been an oasis for Romans in search of respite since ancient times. Discover this volcanic landscape on two wheels with the Countryside Vespa Tour from Scooteroma. Depart from the town of Castel Gandolfo, home to the Pope’s summer residence, and travel winding country roads to the Byzantine Abbey of St. Nile and the wine town of Frascati, with stops for tasty snacks along the way.

4. Discover the secrets of the city’s art with a scholar

Team up with an art historian on a private, personalized tour hosted by Context, a company that connects travelers with a network of experts, for an in-depth examination of the city’s frescoes and mosaics. Routes could involve spotlighting the cult of Mithras in the underground temple of the Basilica of San Clemente or obtaining special access to Palazzo Colonna, a Roman mansion that has been in the same family for over 20 generations.

5. Go behind the scenes of Hollywood classics

Film buffs might be tempted to take a tour of the capital’s Cinecittà studios, but for an intimate look at the big screen’s love affair with Rome, choose the Rome Cinema & Food walk from Casa Mia Tour. On this private excursion, led by the granddaughter of famous filmmaker Vittorio De Sica, participants explore the filming locations of blockbusters like The Bicycle Thief, Roman Holiday, and La Dolce Vita and listen to behind-the-scenes tales from locals and extras. . You’ll also discover filmmakers’ favorite haunts and sample dishes depicted onscreen, before heading for lunch at a local trattoria.

Want to see the classics in a new light? Try LivItaly’s Colosseum and Domus Aurea Virtual Reality Tour.

Photograph by Getty Images

6. Take a New Look at Old Favorites

Finally, for a twist on the classics – and a glimpse into the lives of present Roman citizens and emperors of the past – there’s the Colosseum of LivItaly and the virtual reality tour of the Domus Aurea. This group outing begins in the iconic Amphitheater, where stories of gore and glory come to life thanks to VR glasses. Next, make your way to the nearby excavation site of Emperor Nero’s gargantuan Golden Palace, once again don virtual reality glasses to virtually restore the golden ceiling, marble panels and lush gardens of the vault gilded to their former opulent glory.

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Musical tours planned for 2021 https://palazzobeau.com/musical-tours-planned-for-2021/ https://palazzobeau.com/musical-tours-planned-for-2021/#respond Fri, 02 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://palazzobeau.com/musical-tours-planned-for-2021/ With vaccination rollouts slowly starting in several parts of the world, the music industry is also starting to return to normal. Music festivals have announced new dates for 2021, album releases are on time, and more excitingly, several artists are planning new or rescheduled tour dates for the second half of the year. Bands like […]]]>

With vaccination rollouts slowly starting in several parts of the world, the music industry is also starting to return to normal. Music festivals have announced new dates for 2021, album releases are on time, and more excitingly, several artists are planning new or rescheduled tour dates for the second half of the year.

Bands like Tame Impala and Thundercat have multiple dates scheduled to support their albums released in early 2020, while J. Cole, Jack Harlow, Benny The Butcher, Rod Wave, Lil Durk and Lil Baby are all set to hit the road for projects that dropped between late last year and early 2021. We also have Trippie Redd getting ready to release her new album, as well as staples from Wu-Tang Clan GZA, Raekwon and Ghostface Killah reuniting for a joint tour and Björk who perform several sets unplugged.

As we all look forward to the return of live music, HYPEBEAST has put together a list of tours to catch later this year.

Taming Impala – Phase 1 trials on rushium

Tame Impala hits the road for Slow running with the Phase 1 trials on rushium to visit. Billed as a fictitious pharmaceutical called “Rushium,” the tour is set to begin Sept. 4 in Tennessee for Bonnaroo, and will see Kevin Parker and his company stop in Chicago, Washington DC and Atlanta before ending in Dallas. Texas. Fans can also see Tame Impala live at several festivals, including Life Is Beautiful and Outside Lands. Tickets are available on the official Tame Impala website.

GZA, Raekwon, Ghostface Killah – Visit of the 3 bedrooms

GZA, Raekwon and Ghostface Killah reunite for the Visit of the 3 bedrooms, where the essentials of the Wu-Tang Clan will perform tracks from each of their classic solo albums – Liquid swords, Only built 4 Cuban Linx and Iron Man. The trio will open the tour in Minneapolis on October 1 and perform in areas like Chicago, San Francisco, Boston and New York City until early December, before ending it with one final show in Indianapolis. “As we start to get closer to a return to normal environment, which is long overdue, I am too excited to see my fans again. This 3 Chambers Tour will be something I will recommend that no one miss out on. . This shit will be bananas !!!! Prepare to enter the WU again… (#ironliquidlinxshit), ”Raekwon said in a press release.

Jack Harlow – The cream of the crop tour

Rolling Loud to present Jack Harlow’s upcoming film Tour of the cream of the crop, which will see the GRAMMY nominated artist in places like Miami, Chicago, Atlanta, New Orleans, Houston, Toronto and Los Angeles from July through early December. Harlow, who has already released his first studio effort That’s what they all say, will also make festival appearances at Rolling Loud Miami, Lollapalooza, Hive Music Festival, Bonnaroo, Rolling Loud New York and more. Tickets are available now on Jack Harlow’s website.

J. Cole – The off-season tour

Fresh out of the way Off-season, J. Cole hired 21 Savage and Morray for a month-long tour of North America. The three performers (with the exception of the Atlanta show; Morray won’t be attending) will hit the road in September and will tour 20 different cities, including Boston, Chicago, Detroit, Las Vegas, Oakland and Los Angeles. Cole will also headline Rolling Loud New York and Rolling Loud California, which will take place in October and December respectively. The Off-Season Tour marks the artist’s first tour since his Visit KOD in 2018, so fans who want to see it live can get tickets on the Dreamville website.

Lil Baby x Lil Durk – The return tour outside

Lil Durk and Lil Baby will go on a six-week tour to support their collaborative album, The voice of heroes. Fans can catch the pair in areas like New Orleans, Phoenix, Los Angeles and Brooklyn from September through mid-October, with tickets available through Live Nation.

Thunder Cat – It’s like that North America Tour

Thundercat Celebrates GRAMMY Award Winning Album It’s like that with his biggest headlining tour to date. Joined by Channel Tres in opening act, the artist will kick off in Omaha at the end of July, followed by dates in San Francisco, New Orleans, Phoenix and Seattle until the beginning of December. Fans can get their tickets from the official Thundercat website.

Benny the Butcher – The Burden of Corks Tour

Benny The Butcher celebrates both Burden of proof and The traffic jams I have encountered 2 with the joint The traffic jam tour, which will start in October in Atlanta and stop in Charlotte, Philadelphia, Detroit, San Diego and more before ending in Austin in November. “I RETURNED!” the artist wrote enthusiastically on Instagram, with posts available now on Griselda’s website.

Trippie Redd – Tripp to the knight North America Tour

In anticipation of her next album, Trippie Redd hits the road with Iann Dior and SoFaygo for the Tripp At Knight Tour. Kicking off at the end of August in Minneapolis, fans can see Redd and his guest performers in Cincinnati, Cuyahoga Falls, Atlanta, Miami, Denver, Seattle and more before the last show in Los Angeles in October. Tickets are available now on the official Trippie Redd website.

Björk – Björk Orkestral

Björk will present a series of “unplugged” shows in Iceland between August 29 and September 19 for her Björk Orkestral to visit. The legendary artist will be joined by over 100 different Icelandic musicians across the dates, and each performance will include varied instrumentation and set lists. Fans can expect the string section, brass section and a 15-piece chamber orchestra of the Icelandic Symphony Orchestra, as well as the Viibra Flute Septet to perform pieces by Post, Vespertine, Selmasongs, Medúlla, Biophilia, Utopia, Homogeneous and Vulnicura. All shows will be broadcast live to raise funds for a women’s shelter in Reykjavik called Kvennaathvarfið.

Rod wave – SoulFly Tour

In addition to the Trippie Redd and Jack Harlow tours, Rolling Loud will present the two-month Rod Wave tour SoulFly Tour in support of his album. The 22-year-old artist will kick off his tour on his birthday – August 27 – in Houston before performing in Raleigh, Chicago, Baltimore, Phoenix, Seattle and more. Tickets are available now on the SoulFly Tour website.



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Museums sell courses and virtual tours to increase income during the pandemic. Here’s what they learned about what works https://palazzobeau.com/museums-sell-courses-and-virtual-tours-to-increase-income-during-the-pandemic-heres-what-they-learned-about-what-works/ https://palazzobeau.com/museums-sell-courses-and-virtual-tours-to-increase-income-during-the-pandemic-heres-what-they-learned-about-what-works/#respond Wed, 17 Feb 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://palazzobeau.com/museums-sell-courses-and-virtual-tours-to-increase-income-during-the-pandemic-heres-what-they-learned-about-what-works/ Since the pandemic forced museums to close their doors last spring, a growing number of institutions have been trying to make up for lost revenue by selling tickets to view their exhibits online. If successful, the business model could provide a new source of revenue in the future and support new digital investments. But, let’s […]]]>

Since the pandemic forced museums to close their doors last spring, a growing number of institutions have been trying to make up for lost revenue by selling tickets to view their exhibits online. If successful, the business model could provide a new source of revenue in the future and support new digital investments.

But, let’s face it, it’s a tough sell. For an audience accustomed to seeing museum artifacts in all their IRL splendor, a stroll through the Google Street View version of Dendur Temple is unlikely to live up to it. And it’s just as hard to imagine an audience that isn’t the typical museum audience paying $ 10 to watch a video of a curator browsing an exhibit when there are more sophisticated offerings that compete for attention (and dollars) online.

Nonetheless, the exceptional circumstances forced museums to explore the depths of their ability to generate revenue. With millions of people bored and stuck inside – last March, visitors to the Louvre’s website more than increased tenfold, while visitors to the British Museum’s website grew 137% – many sought to capitalize on increasing online traffic.

In the UK, where most museums depend on at least some degree of government support, institutions have had an added incentive to experiment with new business models. In a leaked letter from the Culture Secretary to museums last August, Oliver Dowden warned that if institutions did not show that they were “looking for every opportunity to maximize alternative sources of revenue,” the government might reconsider a additional financial support to the sector.

So far, the experiments have had mixed results. The Design Museum in London has managed to sell more than 5,000 tickets for its online programs since the first lockdown in March. Today, online visitors can access a virtual tour of its electronic music exhibit for £ 7, and for £ 5 can immerse themselves in a 360-degree digital version of the museum and “walk” through its exhibit ” Designs of the Year “. The museum also offers tickets (usually priced around £ 5) for its lecture program and other live events.

The strategy generated “much needed revenue to support the museum during the shutdown,” a museum spokesperson told Artnet News.

Meanwhile, the Metropolitan Museum in New York has had some success with a program of virtual tours it was launched in June. 60-minute group tours include live discussions on a topic based on a special collection or exhibit, and cost $ 300 per group of up to 40 people ($ 200 for students). Between July and December, the museum served some 116 groups with this option, generating between $ 23,000 and $ 34,000. During the same period, he ran 156 of his 45-minute tours for younger school groups, which cost $ 200 per class (and were free for New York public schools).

It is not known if virtual tours of other museums get the same appeal. Despite saying he was ‘popular’ and ‘doing well’, a spokesperson for the National Gallery in London declined to share attendance figures for his £ 8 online tour. of his Artemisia Gentileschi exhibition which was launched in December. And it’s hard to see these virtual tours have the same appeal once people return to museums in person.

Street view of the Kunsthistoriches Museum in Vienna on Google Arts and Culture.

Focus on expertise

As the pandemic continues and e-learning becomes an increasing part of everyday life, museums are also seeing the potential to monetize their educational expertise through their online offerings. The Met saw its revenue increase last year by offering paid online classes for children and adults, and its latest set of studio workshops and art history classes sold out within days.

Elsewhere, the Barnes Foundation of Philadelphia was quick to move its in-person adult education classes on art and art history online as the pandemic began. Live online courses have proven to be incredibly popular and have raised over $ 600,000 since their launch last March, more than double the revenue generated from in-person courses in 2019.

The institution’s chief business strategy and analyst, Will Cary, told Artnet News that Barnes was “surprised” at the interest in online courses, which in addition to making up for lost revenue admissions and events, helped him connect with more students than already. Between April and December, more than 2,600 students from 39 states and six countries took courses, and 60% of those enrollments were from students who had never taken a Barnes course before.

Encouraged by these results, the Barnes will continue to offer online classes even after in-person classes resume. Cary does not expect a significant drop in registrations. “We expect that there will be a lot of students who will continue to take courses online. in-person lessons.

Notre Dame Cathedral, as seen in the Assassin's Creed Unity video game.  Image courtesy of Ubisoft.

Notre-Dame cathedral seen in the video game Assassin’s Creed: Unity. Image courtesy of Ubisoft.

Get with the players

Forced online migration last year has been an opportunity for institutions and the public to test digital waters, and their experiences have shown some potential. But if they want to make their digital content a source of revenue in the future, they need to think strategically about how to retain their visitors (and attract new audiences).

While the expression “virtual tours of museums “was among the most searched Google searches in 2020, interest peaked in March, perhaps when the novelty of clicking around a virtual gallery wore off. It should be noted, however, that research interest in “virtual learning” has not declined as sharply, indicating that there is more potential for a sustained interest in virtual learning. line.

But museums must think outside the box if they are to continue to inspire consumers to invest in their online content. There is certainly potential for digital experiences as alternative revenue sources for museums, but they need to improve, ”said Erinrose Sullivan, head of museums and cultural heritage at SO REAL, a technology company that offers 3D scanning and conversion services, at Artnet News.

Museums would do well to learn from other industries. “Gaming is a prime example,” Sullivan says, noting that three of the most popular video game franchises –Assassin’s Creed, Tomb Raider, and Unexplored-have story-driven base storylines that engage and excite consumers enough to keep playing. Assassin’s Creed even offers something akin to what museums are trying to do now in its ‘discovery tours’, which allow the user to explore the virtual world of the game and discover culturally significant sites.

Elke Schmidt curator and director of Plazzo Pitti Museum and Gallerie degli Uffizi Museum attends the presentation of "The Medici game" at Palazzo Pitti on October 29, 2019 in Florence, Italy.  Photo by Roberto Serra - Iguana Press / Getty Images.

Elke Schmidt, curator and director of the Plazzo Pitti museum and the Gallerie degli Uffizi museum attends the presentation of “The Medici Game” at the Palazzo Pitti in 2019 in Florence. Photo by Roberto Serra – Iguana Press / Getty Images.

Museums could also create digital experiences that go beyond mimicking the in-person museum experience online. Some have already experimented with the idea, including the Uffizi Galleries, which unveiled a murder mystery video game set at the Pitti Palace Museum in 2019.

Sullivan cites the game Avakin Life, a type of Second Life virtual universe where you can choose clothes and furniture for your space, including artwork. “I have two pieces by Paul Klee in there, something just impossible in the real world,” Sullivan says. “The artwork could be incorporated into a game that can enrich a player’s online life and even play a vital role in the experience itself, an incredibly exciting way to attract a new generation of fans. of art. “

And if museums see digital as a way to generate additional income, they could also look for returns beyond the pockets of their visitors. Sullivan’s company uses technology to create “digital twins” of objects in museum collections, which could then be licensed to third parties such as the game or film industries.

This approach could “tap into a whole new set of funding, while raising awareness of the collections to new audiences,” says Sullivan. “As the world becomes more and more digital, there are many financial opportunities. Museums just need to see how they are harnessing this in new ways. “

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